From The Biblio-Files


A blog-podcast hybrid format that showcases the work of various popular science and science fiction writers, creators, and thinkers from around the world. This project came from a desire to create and sustain a popular science writing book community that allowed readers to better engage in science by expanding their view of the author and the scientific content within the books.

25. Sheril Kirshenbaum From the Biblio-Files

Sheril Kirshenbaum's work has placed her as an expert in science communication. She co-wrote the bestselling book UnScientific America, which discusses the lack of scientific literacy in the American public and ways to fix it. Here she discusses her current work and the impact of her book. 
  1. 25. Sheril Kirshenbaum
  2. 24. Olivia Judson
  3. 23. Randy Olson
  4. 22. Matt Swayne
  5. 21. Brian Jones

Andy Weir and Aliens

Hello Readers! Thank you for following this journey with me of interviewing some of the world’s most creative and unique science writers. This week marks the last week for these blog cast interviews, HOWEVER, all of the interviews will be released as podcast episodes in my new podcast under the same name, From the Biblio-Files.…

Carl Zimmer and the Impact of Genetics

 Hello Readers!  This week I have a real treat of presenting the work of one of the most popular science journalists and writers in our current written world. Carl Zimmer has been a writer for some time, and his reputation for being a thorough investigator and storyteller has brought him much success.  In the interview…

Cody Cassidy and the Physics of Weird Deaths

 Hello Readers!  This week’s blog is a bit morbid, as I interviewed the popular author Cody Cassidy, about his book And Then You’re Dead, which focuses on the physics of weird deaths. And by weird deaths, I’m talking about jumping into a volcano or black hole, or getting swallowed by a whale or shot out…

Brian Jones and Curiosity

 Hello readers, and Happy New Year!  I thought it would only be appropriate to kick the new year off to a good start by showcasing the work of someone I greatly respect and admire. Brian Jones is a professor at Colorado State University (CSU) who teaches physics. I was privileged enough to take two of…

Florence Williams and the Need for Nature

 Hello Readers and Happy Holidays!  This week I’m both honored and flattered to have interviewed Florence Williams, author of the book The Nature Fix. Florence is a contributing editor to Outside magazine and has two best-selling books, including The Nature Fix. She also has a couple podcasts as well that are worth listening to. You…

Matt Montrose and the Power of Games

 Hello, Readers!    Today I have a real treat in store for you, as I interviewed Matt Montrose, of Montrose Biology. Matt developed a card game called “Ecologies” which helps teach the science of food webs, trophic levels, and ecologies. I picked up this game after seeing an ad for it on social media, and…

Heidi Olinger and the Power of Young People

 Hello Readers!  Today is a real treat as I get to brag about Heidi Olinger, a powerful voice within the Colorado community. Heidi is the founder of Pretty Brainy, a non-profit organization that encourages young women to pursue careers within a STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art and Math) field. Heidi started Pretty Brainy back in…

Robert Charles Wilson and the Importance of Science Fiction

 Happy Monday Readers!      This blog is one that I thought I would never write, just because I thought I would never interview this author. Robert Charles Wilson, who I will be talking about today, is a well-known and award-winning science fiction writer. His work has spanned decades, with book titles such as Gypsies, Darwinia,…

James Trefil and the Need for Nerds

 Hello Readers!      This week I want to showcase the writings of James “Jim” Trefil, who I was privileged enough to interview. Jim Trefil is a physicist and a professor at George Mason University. Jim has written over fifty books, which is a lot, but the one I focused on for the interview was Why…

Randy Olson and Narratives of Reel Life

To my Readers,   It is best if I start this blog by saying that I did NOT think I would actually get an interview with this author. Randy Olson, for those of you who aren’t familiar with his work, is a scientist-turned-filmmaker, and currently works at Story Circles Narrative Training. Story Circles is a…

Amy Stewart and the Botany of Alcohol

 Hello, my Curious Readers!  Today’s post I’m especially excited to share with you, as I had the privilege of interviewing best-selling author Amy Stewart. Amy is a beloved author for us botanists, writing books such as Wicked Plants, Wicked Bugs, Flower Confidential, and The Drunken Botanist. She’s also written multiple fiction books as well. In…

Laura Pritchett and the stories of Colorado nature

 Hello, my curious and avid Readers!  This week we’re heading deep into the Colorado wildland to discuss bear populations, rangeland science, and soil. I was privileged enough to interview local writer Laura Pritchett to discuss these topics with her, specifically focusing on her book Great Colorado Bear Stories. I actually contacted Laura years ago for…

Sheril Kirshenbaum and Scientific Literacy

 Hello Lovely Readers!  This week I am honored to showcase an author that inspired me to start the journey into science communication. Sheril Kirshenbaum is both a scientist, and a science communicator, and is best known for teaming up with journalist Chris Mooney to write the book Unscientific America. In this book, Sheril focuses on…

Sam Kean and the periodic table

 Hello, my Amazing Readers!  This week I’m excited to highlight science writer Sam Kean, who was nice enough to grant me an interview. Sam has written many popular books, including The Disappearing Spoon, The Violinist’s Thumb, Caesar’s Last Breath, The Bastard Brigade: The True Story of the Renegade Scientists, and Spies Who Sabotaged the Nazi Atomic…

John Wright and Latin Names

Hello Curious Readers!  This week I had a real treat as I was able to interview John Wright, an amateur mycologist and a science writer who is interested in the Latin names of species. Wright lives in the United Kingdom and had quite a few interesting stories to tell when we started talking. Unfortunately, his…

John Calderazzo and the art of Volcanoes

Hello, my Lovely Readers, This week I was honored to interview John Calderazzo, a nature writer and science communicator. John was a professor of English at Colorado State University, and while I did attend that school, I was never lucky enough to have him as a professor as he had retired by that point. John…

Chris Ferrie and the Science of Astrophysics for Babies

Hello, my lovely readers! I apologize for taking a longer break than usual, as it was the Fourth of July. However, this week I want to talk about science writing for…babies? Yep! I was privileged enough to interview physicist Chris Ferrie, who is also the author of some best-selling baby books about science, such as…

Deborah Blum and the mystery of Poisons

Hello Fellow Readers! This week we have a really cool interview with one of my favorite authors, Deborah Blum. Deborah has been fascinated with the science of chemistry, and in particular, poisons. In interviewing Deborah, I realized that she had I have the same sense of morbid humor, as she told me that she pitched…

Brian Clegg and the Science of Randomness

Hello, my lovely readers! This week we’re moving from the evolution of sexual behavior to theoretical physics. I was honored to interview English science writer Brian Clegg, who has won several awards for his books, as well as worked with the BBC on multiple occasions. I read Brian’s book Dice World, a while ago, and…

Olivia Judson and the Evolution of Sex

Hello, amazing Readers! This week we’re talking about the weirdest and wildest book you’d ever read, all about the evolution of sex on our planet. I interviewed Dr. Olivia Judson, who studies evolution in animal behavior. I’ve met Olivia previously while in my undergraduate research, and we’ve been friends since then. Currently, Olivia is in…

Kathryn Harkup and the Science found in books

Hello Avid Readers! This week is quite special as I was honored to interview best-selling author Kathryn Harkup. Kathryn writes in a very niche genre of looking at the science behind some of the most famous literature in history. I read her book A is for Arsenic, which is all about the poisons in Agatha…

Helen Scales and the Eye of the Shoal

Hello, my avid readers, We have a real treat this week as I was privileged enough to interview Helen Scales, a bestselling author who focuses on marine biology. Helen currently lives in London, and I’ve interviewed her before for my undergraduate thesis. I reached out to her knowing she had a new book come out.…

Tom Morris and Medical Mysteries

Hello everyone! This week I’m introducing writer Thomas Morris, and his book The Mystery of the Exploding teeth. Tom started this book by writing a blog on Victorian medical reports, and the weird case studies he found. He realized that there were enough weird stories (where patients were sticking things up…places…or limbs were falling off…or…

Sy Montgomery and Animal behaviors

A few months ago I interviewed Sy Montgomery to discuss her award-winning book, The Soul of an Octopus. Sy and I have talked before when I reached out to her for my undergraduate thesis. She lives on the East Coast and has written over 60 books. I read The Soul of an Octopus quite a…

Welcome!

Hello Readers! Welcome to “From the Biblio-files!” This was originally supposed to be a podcast, but I have turned it into a blogcast instead! Now you may be wondering what a blogcast actually is, and yes I did just make up that word. It’s a blog with an audio file mixed in so readers can…